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edwardjeni



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PostPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2017 3:42 pm    Post subject: If a post contains some illegal issues you may abuse on it - just click Abuse and fill the form Reply with quote

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edwardjeni



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PostPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2017 3:45 pm    Post subject: If a post contains some illegal issues you may abuse on it - just click Abuse and fill the form Reply with quote

Sep 17 2017 : The Economic Times (Mumbai)
Need for Speed
Amitabh Kant


The MumbaiAhmedabad bullet train project can pave the way for making India a hub for manufacturing worldclass rolling stock
Ezra Vogel, whose 1979 classic Japan as Number One: Lessons for America became a best seller, believed that Japan will revitalise it self through technology, transportation and economic integration with Asia. In many ways, the high-speed train collabora tion between Japan and India vindicates his belief. The foundation stone for the MumbaiAhmedabad High Speed Railway Project (MAHSR), laid on September 14 by the two prime ministers, Narendra Modi and Shinzo Abe, is a huge leap towards India and Japan converging and integrating themselves in a long-term sustainable economic relationship.

The project will enable Indians to learn the Japanese art of perfection in engineering and execution, and pick up innovative and sustainable practices through the Make in India initiative. The launch also culminates a long process of preparations and negotiations between the two countries. It is an occasion to reflect on some of the key aspects of the project and the process followed in reaching this milestone.

The first firm step towards implementation of the MAHSR project was the initiation of the detailed feasibility report by JICA and the Ministry of Railways. Work on the feasibility report started in 2013 and concluded in July 2015. However, the formal decision to go ahead was taken only after a rigorous project appraisal by the Committee on Innovative Collaborations (CoIC), which was set up in 2015 to consider such high-value projects. This committee comprised the vice-chairman of NITI Aayog, chairman of the Railway Board, secretaries of DIPP (this writer was the DIPP secretary then) and DEA, former cabinet secretary KM Chandrasekhar and ex-CVC P Shankar. The issues considered in detail included the relevance of highspeed rail for India and why the Japanese proposal was technologically and financially the best. The project could be taken forward as it had high level of political commitments driven by the prime minister himself who wanted high-speed transportation to reach the masses. The argument for HSR is that it is a different level of technology and India can ill afford to ignore it at this stage of its national development. A network of HSR in the longer run would facilitate travelling with enhanced passenger comfort, safety and environmental benefits. An HSR system would also release capacity of existing rail lines, enabling faster movement of freight and passenger traffic on the existing lines.The HSR system also releases capacity of airports as short-haul flights get curtailed.This capacity in turn could be utilised for longer duration flights that improve economics of air transport. In addition, development of new cities, promotion of manufacturing to supply equipment and components for the HSR system would provide employment to a growing and better skilled workforce. Investment in HSR is a highly beneficial system because of its various spinoffs, including infusion of new technology in the country which in the long run would lead to improvement in the operations of the existing railway network also. The project is being structured in a manner that it leads to large-scale manufacturing of rolling stock, signalling systems and other electrical equipment and components under Make in India.

All the major suppliers of HSR technology -Japan, China and European countries -were willing to share it with us. But the crucial factor that convinced the CoIC to choose Japan was that it was the only country that offered both technology as well as a unique funding package for the HSR project. The concessional funding proposed by the government of Japan for HSR was specific to the project between Mumbai and Ahmedabad and was not available for strengthening the existing rail network.

The Japanese Shinkansen technology was preferable for a variety of reasons. It is the oldest HSR system. It operates trains at speeds of over 320 kmhour. The Japanese HSR system has the best safety record in the world with no passenger fatalities in the last 50 years. The Chinese system, which is the largest system at present in terms of route km, is of recent origin. There have been fatalities on the Chinese system.Japanese railways is by far the best in the world for on-time performance. The average delay per trip is within one minute. The Japanese system is disaster-resistant with an earthquake detection system kicking in in the event of an earthquake, which halts the train immediately. Japan's offer of technology is accompanied by an extremely comprehensive training programme for Indian Railways engineers and the setting up of a High Speed Training Institute at Vadodara.

World-Beating Combo

Another important feature of the Japanese collaboration is their offer to transfer technology and Make in India, including manufacture of rolling stock in India. It will be a world-beating combination if Japanese technology can combine with the large cost-effective engineering skills available in India so that India can become a hub for manufacturing world-class rolling stock that can be exported all over the world.

Now that the foundation stone has been laid, the work is cut out for the engineers of India's implementing agency, the National High Speed Rail Corporation Limited (NHSRCL), who are being assisted by consultants from JICA.

The high-speed project marks a beginning of a new era for inter-city transportation in India. While the executing agencies are involved in realising this technologically challenging project, national planners should apply their minds to develop a road map for future HSR projects and other aspects such as safety certifications for such projects and for extending the technology to other parts of the country.

The Japanese have demonstrated their excellence in the Delhi Metro.They are partners in the western stretch of the Dedicated Freight Corridor and the Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor. These projects along with the high-speed train open up a vast array of opportunities.

In these fields, the story has just be gun in India whereas it is almost over in other markets. India needs next-generation technology to leapfrog. In cuttingedge technology, the Japanese companies are highly advanced: they innovate, they are perfectionists and several companies work together in a consortium. The highspeed train will act as a huge social and psychological change act -it should change the mindset of Indians, particularly the Railways, and teach them the art of excellence, safety, punctuality and perfection.

Professor Donald Keene, who had taught for more than 50 years at Columbia University, announced his decision at the age of 89 to become a Japanese citizen and spend his last days in Japan. He said, “If any civilisation has constantly suffered tragedies and always bounced back, it is Japan. It is because they believe in discipline, team work and perfection. I want to live with these people. I want to die with these people.“

It is this uniqueness which Japan brings to India through the high-speed train project. It can catalyse Indian Railways to transform itself and become a global leader in size, scale, skill and safety.
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edwardjeni



Joined: 22 Sep 2008

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Location: Kanyakumari

PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2017 12:28 am    Post subject: If a post contains some illegal issues you may abuse on it - just click Abuse and fill the form Reply with quote

Sep 17 2017 : The Times of India (Pune)
Bullet train project adviser lays stress on speedy land acquisition to meet deadline
Nisha Nambiar
Pune:


The process of acquiring land for the 508km Mumbai-Ahmedabad High Speed Bullet Rail, in collaboration with the Japanese government, will have to be expedited to meet the 2023 project completion deadline, the newly appointed adviser to the bullet train project Sanjeev Sinha has stated.

PM Narendra Modi and Japanese PM HE Shinzo Abe laid the foundation stone of the project on Thursday.

On the sidelines of a function in the city, Sinha told TOI that governments of both Maharashtra and Gujarat had already delayed the land acquisition process.

“We are already long overdue and we're hoping that both states speed up the land acquisition process so that the project implementation can speed up and we do not miss the 2023 deadline,“ said Sinha.

The railways will require a little over 800 hectares of land for the project as nearly 90% of the route will be elevated. About 2% of the route will be underground. A 21km-long tunnel will be created between Boisar and Bandra Kurla Complex in Mumbai, of which 7km will be under the sea.

Another hurdle the adviser envisages is ensuring enough human resource within the country. “We have to ensu re that there is enough human resource to take the project forward through various collaborations with Japanese companies and that the Japanese government's funding is channelized in the right manner,“ stated Sinha.

For this, the adviser is helping form a technology fund that will streamline the process of funding coming to India for the project so that it can channelized for the right use.The project is expected to generate employment for 20,000 people directly and indirect employment for about 2-3 lakh. Moreover, Sinha is also exploring possibilities for investment along the rail corridor and in the food and entertainment aspects.“Talks are on with several people and we should see many investors from India taking up the project,“ stated Sinha who also had a discussion with some Pune investors regarding the project.

Elaborating further Sinha said that technology , funding and human resources can take the project ahead and help meet the 2023 deadline. At the same time, a dedicated high speed rail training institute will coach technical staff for the project.

With PM Modi's announcement stating that the project is almost free, Sinha reiterated that the amount is like a `grant', considering the time frame of 50 years to repay the loan of Rs88,000 crore.
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edwardjeni



Joined: 22 Sep 2008

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 18, 2017 1:17 pm    Post subject: If a post contains some illegal issues you may abuse on it - just click Abuse and fill the form Reply with quote

Sep 18 2017 : The Times of India (Delhi)
LEARNING WITH THE TIMES - 16 Nations Have Bullet Trains
TIMES INSIGHT GROUP


What is a high speed railway?

There's no standard definition, but a railway system designed for speeds above 250kmph is generally called high speed -sections of these routes may have lower speed limits for safety reasons. Only 16 nations have high-speed railways -China boasts the world's longest network with 27,000km of such tracks. Japan, Spain, France and Germany are the others where tracks dedicated for high-speed trains stretch over 1,000 km.

When was the first high-speed network built?

Japan's high-speed line between Tokyo and Osaka was inaugurated in 1964; the famous Shinkansen `bullet train' (named for its shape) could reach a speed of 210 kmph. It aly was among early European nations to experiment, with sections of the Florence-Rome line becoming Europe's first high-speed railway , top speed 250kmph. This was in 1977. The entire route was completed in 1992. The national French rail company started its first full high-speed line, between Paris and Lyons, on September 27, 1981, with top speed of 260kmph.

Can these trains run on conventional tracks?

Most high-speed trains run on conventional tracks similar to conventional gauge systems, but built with stronger material. The train on such a track is likely to have two synchronised engines (power cars), one at either end. Most receive power from roof-mounted pantographs and overhead supply lines. A large part of route alignment is kept straight to support high speed.Although in most countries these trains operate on dedicated tracks, many can also run on conventional tracks at reduced speeds.

What are Maglev trains?

Unlike conventional trains that use wheels, the Maglev is based on magnetic levitation. Electromagnets levitate the train a short distance just above the tracks. These magnets also create the thrust that moves the train. Compared to conventional trains, Maglev has superior controls as its acceleration and braking doesn't depend on friction of the track. The Maglev is very expensive to construct and there are only three operational commercial Maglev systems -in Japan, China and South Korea. Shanghai Maglev has the highest run speed of 431kmph for an operational train covering a 30.5-km distance in 7mnts 20secs.

What is the high-speed rail network's global infrastructure?

The total length of high speed rail lines across the world is about 43,000km. China has 65% of this network, and accounts for over 60% of global high-speed passenger traffic.

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edwardjeni



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PostPosted: Tue Sep 19, 2017 2:46 pm    Post subject: If a post contains some illegal issues you may abuse on it - just click Abuse and fill the form Reply with quote

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edwardjeni



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2017 4:13 pm    Post subject: If a post contains some illegal issues you may abuse on it - just click Abuse and fill the form Reply with quote

`More trips key to bullet train success'
Ahmedabad:
TIMES NEWS NETWORK


The Ahmedabad-Mumbai corridor has the second largest passenger density in the world, coming after Osaka-Tokyo in Japan, said Professor G Raghuram, director of Indian Institute of ManagementBanaglore (IIMB), and author of the research study titled `Dedicated High Speed Rail Network in India: Issues in Development.' Raghuram stressed that 80 trips of the bullet train every day on this local route may turn the high speed rail (HSR) project economically feasible.

Raghuram, who heads Public Policy Center in IIM-B also believes that economic viability should not be the only aspect of consideration for bullet train as the HSR network will lead to around 40% rise in travel by those not regualr commuters on Ahmedabad-Mumbai route.

“We have proposed that 100 trips every day , even after 15 years, will have to be made for financial viability of the project.In my own judgement, 100 trips seem quite feasible as Ahmed abad-Mumbai is a high density corridor which is second probably only to Tokyo-Osaka in the world,“ added Raghuram.

Raghuram said that apart from financial viability , the addvanced technology will push significant industrial development between Ahmedabad-Mumbai corridor when combined with efforts of industrious Gujarati people. “If you look at the economic viability, it can be achieved with fe wer trips. Even 80 trips could suffice,“ Raghuram told TOI.

Raghuram stressed instead of analysing if bullet train is financially viable or not, time has come to adopt the high speed network which is operational in six to seven odd countries. “My main contention is that as long as the ticket is priced at affordable rates enabling the lower income groups like artisans, plumber, workers and salesmen to travel, their economic productivity will go up substantially,“ he said.

The high-speed train, which is expected to begin operating in 2022, will run at a maximum speed of 350 kmph and will cover the 508-km stretch in under three hours.The ambitious project will cost around Rs1.10 lakh crore. Japan is giving a loan of Rs88,000 crore for the project at a minimal interest of 0.1%.

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kpchandru



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PostPosted: Sun Sep 24, 2017 12:34 pm    Post subject: If a post contains some illegal issues you may abuse on it - just click Abuse and fill the form Reply with quote

So Many stops for a high speed train !! Will definitlety spoil its fast run. Stops aline will ccount for oen full hour, it seems.
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srirangam99



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PostPosted: Thu Sep 28, 2017 11:49 am    Post subject: If a post contains some illegal issues you may abuse on it - just click Abuse and fill the form Reply with quote

Bullet trains: Far too costly for India by Yogi Aggarwal

Work began on the bullet train (or superfast train) project in the very month that the Indian Railways suffered a major setback in having nine accidents and derailments. The question that it raised was whether the above Rs 1 trillion (lakh crore) to be spent on the 534-km Mumbai-Ahmedabad bullet train be better spent by the Railways on improving overall safety, ensuring timely delivery of heavy materials like steel, coal or cement for industry, and raising the level of passenger comfort.

The superfast train looks very attractive on many counts — reducing the time of travel by more than half, gradually building the skills in industry to service the needs of building tracks and safety systems for the Railways and helping to develop small towns like Palghar or Vapi near the track, which can be halts.

Added to this is the high safety and punctuality level in Japan’s Shinkansen, or bullet train system. These bullet trains have been operational since 1964, have carried over 10 billion passengers till now, without a single accident or casualty and an average delay of less than one minute. These standards are phenomenal, but it is highly unlikely that the prevailing culture in India will allow that to be replicated here.

Though Japan was the first country in the world to build bullet trains, many other nations have followed, notably France, China and Germany. China has moved ahead the fastest, now having 22,000 km of track for bullet trains. It has exported train systems to Thailand and Indonesia and is an avid seeker of markets. Though the trains are cheaper, India prefers Japan for geopolitical reasons, and to not allow Chinese influence to grow in our infrastructure policy. Japan has so far only managed to sell its bullet trains to Taiwan, but has not transferred the technology.

The Rs 1.1 trillion cost may not seem very much for such a large project, but when compared to alternatives or the high cost of travel, that will invariably be subsidised, the picture begins to change.

The original Shinkansen, connecting Japan’s largest cities Tokyo and Osaka is the world’s busiest high-speed rail line. Carrying close to half a million passengers daily per year on 350 trains, at peak times the line carries up to 13 trains per hour in each direction with 16 cars each (1,323-seat capacity) with a minimum headway of three minutes between trains. It is a profitable route, unlike most other lines which run at a loss, but the fare is around $130 (around `8,400) for a one-way Shinkansen ticket from Tokyo to Osaka.

Profitability is a notoriously hard task for high-speed train networks. Most lines that criss-cross Europe, for example, are in the red.

One of the factors in favour of bullet trains is that there would be a transfer of technology to Indian industry and we would in time be able to build fast systems ourselves. There is no mention of transfer of technology and Japan is known not to guarantee safety unless they build the entire system.

The proposed Mumbai-Ahmedabad route would have 35 trains a day — one-tenth that of the Tokyo-Osaka route, that costs $130 (around `8,400) per one-way ticket or roughly double the airfare. With less frequent trains, the costs in India would be far higher. And since it is extremely unlikely that the Railways would be able to fill some 46,000 seats a day (35 multiplied by 1,323) at these rates, the subsidy would have to be stupendous. Needless to say, this would mostly go to people who politically support Prime Minister Narendra Modi. A subsidy of about half the fare will mean a loss of Rs 1.91 crores to the Railways every day, or around `700 crores a year.

To get an idea of the magnitude of the costs involved, former railway minister Suresh Prabhu’s first Rail Budget in 2014 projected a five-year expenditure of a similar amount for network expansion and strengthening safety over five years in the entire country. It will be reasonable to assume that in the light of recent rail accidents, this money was not well spent. The Railways would be further impoverished for their needs to support the white elephant of a bullet train, that will be a fancy showpiece but achieve little else else.

The Indian Railways are the country’s largest public investment, employing over a million people. Over the decades they have been neglected and have lost marketshare to other means of transport. A rejuvenation of the Indian Railways is badly needed, but not through elitist solutions like bullet trains. Investment in new rails, signalling equipment, rolling stock of wagons and passenger facilities and proper management could push up the utilisation of rail capital, ultimately leading to better services and faster trains.

But the Narendra Modi government prefers flamboyant high-profile projects to those that offer the maximum effect on ground. In its eagerness to push the bullet train, it hides the cost by talking of a “virtually” interest-free loan from the Japanese government of Rs 88,000 crores. But this ignores the fact that the loan is in yen, which has a history of appreciating with other currencies, specially the rupee.


Many other issues arise. Land acquisition is one. The bullet train will run on dedicated tracks, separate from regular ones, that will have to be fenced to prevent humans and animals straying on the rails. This will double the land required and increase costs.

India is a large country with one of the largest and oldest railway systems in the world. It has skills that have not been allowed to develop. China built its own huge bullet train system in the 1980s with some initial help from the Japanese, but largely on its own. The Indian Railways need a major push to modernise, to have safer and more secure trains, a faster turnaround of freight traffic, and quicker passenger trains to increase the total share of passenger traffic, and better stations that provide clean food and water. We have the ability to do this on our own, and not be led up the garden path with fancy promises.

source: http://www.asianage.com/opinion/columnists/280917/bullet-trains-far-too-costly-for-india.html

_________________
N.Srinivasan
New Delhi
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karthik2180



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PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2019 8:05 am    Post subject: If a post contains some illegal issues you may abuse on it - just click Abuse and fill the form Reply with quote

https://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/energy-and-environment/bullet-train-gets-green-light-via-flamingo-haven-national-park/article26188009.ece/amp/?__twitter_impression=true
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karthik2180



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PostPosted: Thu Feb 14, 2019 3:46 pm    Post subject: If a post contains some illegal issues you may abuse on it - just click Abuse and fill the form Reply with quote

SIGN IN HOME\NEWS\INDIA\NOW, RAILWAY EMPLOYEES TOO OPPOSE Bullet train

Read more at:
https://punemirror.indiatimes.com/news/india/now-railway-employees-too-oppose-bullet-train-project/articleshow/67988080.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst
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